(02) 6620 1800 [email protected]
Rental lists for week commencing Oct 31, 2022

Rental lists for week commencing Oct 31, 2022

Click the links below to view the latest rental vacancy lists for the Northern Rivers region, including Tweed Heads, Lismore, Ballina, Grafton and Casino.

If you or somebody you know is homeless, or is at risk of homelessness, contact Link2Home 1800 152 152 for 24 hour emergency support.

If you are living from Tweed Heads to Grafton, you can contact Connecting Home on 1800 048 310 between 9am – 4:30pm
Monday – Friday or email [email protected]

  • Grafton
  • Ballina
  • Lismore
  • Tweed Heads
  • Casino / Kyogle / Tenterfield & Surrounding areas.

Grafton Greater Region Rental Properties

Ballina – Greater Region NSW

Lismore Greater Region Rental Properties

Tweed Shire Rental Properties

Casino North Casino Rental Properties

Workforce Planning Tool Training

Aged Care Workforce Industry Council are offering an online session to demonstrate the Workforce Planning Tool 28 October register here: https://acwic.com.au/workforce-planning-tool/#lunchnlearn

The Aged Care Workforce Industry Council provides a range of free resources that include easy-to-use tools, guides and papers to help create solutions for the aged care sector. To access their resources follow the link:

https://acwic.com.au/resource-hub/

Recovery Connect: New support service for communities impacted by flooding

Social Futures is delivering a new support service – Recovery Connect – for individuals and communities impacted by this year’s floods.

Social Futures Chief Executive Tony Davies said the aim of Recovery Connect is to link people to all the services they need.

‘At Recovery Connect you will meet your “recovery linker”, who will listen to your story, understand and identify your needs, then either directly assist you or connect you to the right services,’ Mr Davies said.

‘You won’t have to keep re-telling your story to numerous organisations and the recovery linker can help in a wide variety of areas.

‘This includes being able to link you to specialist counselling, financial assistance, legal advice, available grants, business and employment supports, mental health services and much more.’

Mr Davies said the service, funded by the NSW Government, would support anyone navigating services and grant applications.

‘We will act on your advice and of course outline all available choices. We can be your single point of contact to services in your dealings with government and non-government agencies,’ said Mr Davies.

Recovery Connect can offer help with:

  • addressing physical needs (including accessing furniture, food, clothes, housing services)
  • accessing financial assistance (including applying for employment, business and housing grants), legal advice and financial counselling
  • accessing mental health and wellbeing support
  • dealing with practicalities, such as replacing personal documents
  • addressing post-disaster recovery (planning, insurance, legal, etc.).

Recovery Connect is available to anyone living in the local government areas of Lismore, Tweed Heads, Byron, and the Clarence Valley. Contact Recovery Connect on 1800 719 625 or email [email protected]

Not-for-profit and government agencies can also refer participants to Recovery Connect.

Free Online Aged Care Learning Modules

Free online learning modules to support aged care workers are now available through the University of Tasmania’s Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre.

Funded by the Department of Health and Aged Care, the Equip Aged Care Learning Packages cover 14 contemporary topics in aged care. The modules are designed for direct care workers, volunteers, caregivers and anyone with an interest in improving care for older people.

The first 3 learning modules are available now, and provide an overview of the:

  • Australian aged care system
  • role of nurses, personal care workers and allied health professionals working in aged care
  • Aged Care Quality Standards.

Register and enrol for these modules at Equip Aged Care Learning (utas.edu.au).

For further enquiries, email [email protected]

Briefing for seasonal outlook, Risks and Emergency Preparedness

Briefing for seasonal outlook, Risks and Emergency Preparedness

The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), in partnership with the Department of Health and Aged Care and the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission, is hosting an important briefing on the seasonal outlook, risks, and preparedness relevant to residential aged care homes and flexible aged care services.

The webinar will be held on Friday 28 October 2022 from 1:00pm – 3:00pm AEDT.

This briefing will provide you with advice on the risks and preparedness for the high-risk weather season, including:

  • Seasonal weather outlook from the Bureau of Meteorology
  • Updates from the National Emergency Management Agency, Department of Health and Aged Care and the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission
  • Advice on how the aged care sector can assist and connect to the Australian Government during the high-risk weather season
  • A short crisis scenario run-through and discussion.

How to Join

The webinar will be held via MS Teams. If you are interested, please record the date and time in your calendar.

To join: from a personal device or computer by clicking the link below:
Click here to join the meeting
Meeting ID: 486 260 362 859
Passcode: MU8HGD
Download Teams | Join on the web

Or call in (audio only)
+61 2 7208 4914 Australia, Sydney
Phone Conference ID: 638 850 425#
Find a local number | Reset PIN
Learn More | Meeting options
Please ensure you dial in 15–20 minutes early.

Mixed budget reaction from community services sector 

Mixed budget reaction from community services sector 

The Community Service sector newsletter, Pro Bono, published the following article on the Federal Budget.

‘The community sector is giving a mixed reception to the federal budget, with nods for community services funding and support for volunteering, but roundly condemning the lack of movement on JobSeeker rates even as the government issues its much-criticised stage 3 tax cuts.

“As cost of living and housing pressures go through the roof, people who rely on income support are unable to pay for many of the essentials of life,” Mission Australia’s CEO Sharon Callister said.

“Mission Australia acknowledges the $33 billion allocated to income support in the budget over the forward estimates, which reflects rises in payments linked to the cost of inflation and the projection that unemployment will worsen in the coming years. However, this does nothing to adequately increase support to a level that keeps people out of poverty and homelessness.”

Australian Council of Social Service CEO Dr Cassandra Goldie shared Mission’s concerns. 

“We remain deeply concerned for people who have the least and are in chronic financial distress – people who are unemployed, single parents, people with disabilities, students and people on temporary visas. There isn’t enough in this budget to help them right now,” she said.

“People on the lowest incomes are facing multiple and unrelenting crises right now – extreme weather events, rising rents, food and fuel costs, and the prospect of more losing their jobs means that government must deliver on lifting incomes and social and affordable housing.

“Instead of spending money on stage 3 tax cuts, we could lift incomes, including jobseeker and disaster recovery payments, fund social housing, and adequately fund community services so they can help people when they need it most.”

Anti-Poverty Network SA spokesperson Duncan Bainbridge said the most recent $1.83-a-day rise to JobSeeker, an automatic, twice-a-year indexation to ensure JobSeeker matches inflation, does not even come close to matching what is happening to people’s lives. 

“JobSeeker is only $48 a day. People on JobSeeker are facing unprecedented, unsustainable rises in rents, and other basic costs. We hear of $30-$50-a-week rent rises, compounded by double-digit percentage increases in utility and fresh food costs. These increases are blowing a low-income person’s budget to pieces,” he said. 

“Labor should recognise this, and implement an immediate raise to JobSeeker and other payments, lifting them above the poverty-line, something long supported by most of the community.”

Anglicare Australia executive director Kasy Chambers said the most disappointing part of the budget was the stage 3 tax cuts. 

“Even those set to benefit say they don’t need them,” she said. 

“These tax cuts will damage our progressive tax system and lock-in unfairness. Our costings show that if the government scrapped the tax cuts, it could lift 2.4 million people out of poverty and boost affordable housing – with savings to spare.

“If the government is serious about wellbeing, it should be lifting people out of poverty – not handing money back to people who don’t want or need it.”

Youth

Mission Australia welcomed funding for a new Office for Youth and the Australian Youth Affairs Coalition. 

“The government has recognised that now is a critical time to ensure young people are heard and should play a key role in creating and advising on solutions that will address issues that affect them, other young people, and Australia,” said Sharon Callister.  

“Young people have the answers. It’s a matter of ensuring they are genuinely listened to, included in decision-making processes, and their concerns acted upon. Because Australia’s future rests on the shoulders of our young people.”

Advocates had called for extensive measures easing the pressure on young people in the lead up to the budget.

Community services  

Anglicare Australia said it welcomed $560 million investment in community services, as well as investment in aged care, paid parental leave and child care. 

“The government is also making a start on the cost-of-living crisis. Charities and community groups are seeing more and more people come to us for help, but our funding isn’t keeping up,” said Chambers. 

“Tonight’s fund for one-off top-ups will help in the short-term. In the long-term, we will work with the government to make sure the services people rely on are funded to keep up with rising costs – nothing short of a fair and transparent indexation will fix this.”

Mission Australia’s Sharon Callister also said the the community services funding is a good first step to “meet the funding gap to deliver support to people in need, when they need it”.

“However, we are concerned that the competitive process to access those funds will force non-profit organisations to compete with each other and will divert valuable resources towards jumping through hoops for extra funding,” she said.

“We look forward to hearing more from the government about their future plans for the long-term adequacy and sustainability of community services.”

Volunteering

Volunteering Australia says significant new funding will support major volunteer-involving organisations, recognising the “crucial role volunteers play supporting the priorities of the federal government”.

The Disaster Relief Australia (DRA)’s National Veteran Volunteer Service will receive a  $38.3 million funding boost, which will lead to around 6,700 veterans providing over 13,600 volunteer days a year. 

“Volunteering Australia welcomes the Australian Treasurer’s commitment to putting wellbeing and ‘measuring what matters’ at the heart of future budgets,” Volunteering Australia CEO Mark Pearce said. 

“It is essential that volunteering is included in the frameworks and metrics that are used to track wellbeing and to guide the allocation of spending.”

ACOSS responds to the Federal Budget

ACOSS responds to the Federal Budget

This is a budget that delivers on some of the government’s important election commitments, and the Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) welcomes them.

Here is ACOSS’s response to the budget –

‘We are pleased to see the $560m investment in community services, as well as investment in aged care, paid parental leave and child care. We also welcome funding for 500 frontline workers to support women and children escaping domestic violence. We will continue to advocate for the government to improve the level of investment in community services over the longer term.

We now have a new cross-government housing accord, which lays the foundations for increasing the supply of social and affordable housing in Australia to deal with the housing crisis. The Commonwealth’s housing investment will build 40,000 dwellings (half social, half affordable) over five years. This is a serious start to tackling the housing crisis. We will need a lot more social housing dwellings to ensure everyone has a home.  

Other measures we welcome include provision for at least $3b in disaster payments over 5 years, investment in The Voice and an Anti-racism Strategy, 500,000 fee-free TAFE places, and restoration of frontline jobs at Centrelink.

We remain deeply concerned about the lack of action to lift the incomes of people living on payments like JobSeeker, which is just $48 a day. There are over 3 million people living in poverty, with many on JobSeeker and Youth Allowance forced to skip meals and essential medication, and live in their cars.

In a wealthy country like Australia, we should not condemn people to living on such inadequate incomes.

People on the lowest incomes face multiple and unrelenting crises including high inflation, 150,000 more people unemployed in 2023, rents up 10% in just one year, high debt as well as multiple climate disasters. So, this must be the beginning and not the end of the hard work this government must do. We must see an urgent increase in income support for people on the lowest incomes in Australia.

The Federal Government must lift JobSeeker and related income support payments to at least $73 a day, increase Rent Assistance by 50%, and establish supplements for people with disability and single parents to recognise the additional costs they face.

The Government must also take urgent direct action to reduce inflation, including by capping increases in gas prices, and invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy for low-income households.

We’re also very troubled to see that budget spending is forecast to increase by only 0.3% per annum, after inflation, when we know we must deliver critical essential services to meet community need. It’s obvious the government will need more revenue to meet the community’s urgent needs, and for this reason, we cannot afford the $19b a year tax cuts starting in 2024. The government must reverse these tax cuts.

Australian Council of Social Service CEO Dr Cassandra Goldie said:

“We remain deeply concerned for people who have the least and are in chronic financial distress – people who are unemployed, single parents, people with disabilities, students and people on temporary visas. There isn’t enough in this budget to help them right now.

“People on the lowest incomes are facing multiple and unrelenting crises right now – extreme weather events, rising rents, food and fuel costs, and the prospect of more losing their jobs means that government must deliver on lifting incomes and social and affordable housing.

“Instead of spending money on stage 3 tax cuts, we could lift incomes, including jobseeker and disaster recovery payments, fund social housing, and adequately fund community services so they can help people when they need it most.

“These are the very essentials at the heart of a wellbeing budget, and what so many in our community need to get through difficult times.’

Ballina Clubhouse is open!

Ballina Clubhouse is open!

Clubhouse Ballina is open Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, 3:30pm-6pm during school terms. All young people aged 12-18 are welcome to attend. Participants are supervised by 2-4 staff members and volunteers.

Clubhouse Ballina is a creative hub. Young people can expect to feel welcome and safe while exploring creative arts, music and the ‘STEM’ fields: science, technology, engineering and maths.

See the pamphlet for more information.

Clubhouse Ballina has amazing mentors who help participants to develop their passions through projects that inspire self-expression and technological know-how. The Clubhouse approach to learning leverages technology to empower young people from all backgrounds to become more capable, creative, and confident learners.

Activities include:

–              Greenscreen

–              Podcast

–              Music

–              Technology

–              3D Printing

–              Robotics

–              Art and Craft

–              Gardening

–              Cooking

Earn and Learn with a Housing Cadetship

Earn and Learn with a Housing Cadetship

Together with the NSW Government, the Community Housing Industry Association (CHIA) NSW is providing new training opportunities connected to jobs in the Community Housing Industry through a Cadetship Program.

This exciting program provides an opportunity for cadets to undertake paid employment and training across the areas of application/allocation, tenancy management and property management.

With 25 cadetships offered each year until 2024, all participants who successfully obtain a place will enter a 12-month paid employment contract with a Community Housing Provider and enrol to study